Meningitis and Medical Malpractice

Meningitis is inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. It is commonly caused by infection, but other causes include chemical irritants, drug allergies, fungi, and tumors. Based on the clinical evolution of the illness and the type of inflammatory exudate present in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), infectious meningitis is categorized into acute pyogenic (usually bacterial), aseptic (usually viral), and chronic (usually tuberculosis, spirochetal, cryptococcal). Early diagnosis is essential Continue Reading

Lumbar Puncture & Medical Malpractice

Lumbar puncture is a procedure performed in the lower back area, where a needle is inserted between two vertebrae to remove a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient flexes his/her back to widen the spaces between the vertebrae so it is easier for the physician to access the region. The back is washed with antiseptic soap or iodine and covered with a sterile sheet. A local anesthetic is used to numb the area and Continue Reading

Fungal Meningitis Outbreak- over 300 infected, 25 deaths

An outbreak of fungal meningitis due to contaminated epidural methylpredinsolone (steroid) injections, made by the New England Compounding Center, has been ongoing throughout the United States. Meningitis is a disease caused by inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungus, physical injury, cancer, and certain medications. Fungal meningitis is generally rare and non-contagious. In the recent outbreak of fungal meningitis, the contaminant Continue Reading